NEDERLANDSE ACCESS DEVELOPER DAG 2018

Presentatie: Interesting components of a medical application

Tom van Stiphout (Kinetik IT) & Daniel Polak (SYS)

Your road to success: Make your users kick ass by putting the Task front and center

Synopsis:
As database people we may think that as long as we provide a set of forms and reports to create, read, update, and delete the data in our tables, applying some constraints and validation, we are well on our way to delivering a user-friendly business application.
That may be true for a simple Northwind-style application, but if we're talking about a more complex application there are other considerations, and you are doing your clients a big favor taking them into account. We're talking about items such as:
• Minimizing training time for new users
• Minimizing time needed to perform a task
○ Consistent form layout. Metro design concepts.
• Supervisor visibility in work getting completed.
○ Monitor productivity
○ Reassign and re-prioritize tasks
In this talk we will touch on a few of these and focus on a task-driven approach, which forces us to think differently and build solutions that are easier to learn and easier to use.

Over Tom van Stiphout

Tom is the Software Development Manager of Kinetik IT. Located in Phoenix, Arizona, Kinetik IT is a full service information technology and internet services provider, offering a wide array of technology and internet strategy solutions.

Tom has a degree from Amsterdam University and came to the United States in 1991.

After a few years with C++ and Windows SDK programming, he gradually focused more and more on database programming.
He worked with Microsoft Access from version 1.0, and Microsoft SQL Server from version 4.5, when both were quite immature products. Tom added .NET programming to his repertoire and he is particularly interested in hybrid applications that combine the best of what various platforms have to offer.

Tom has been a frequent contributor to the Access newsgroups and forums for many years, and has been an Access MVP for 10 years. His blogs can be found on accessmvp.com and accesssecurityblog.com.